Brief Screens do not replace comprehensive evaluations, but are appropriate to help determine if an extensive evaluation is needed and/or additional services. Brief Screens are cost effective, while full evaluations can cost $150 to $550 or more, Screens are $40.00. They are also quick, with results being sent the court or referring agency within hours of taking the screen.

 

Anger-Aggression-Violence Assessment (AAVA)

The Anger-Aggression-Violence (AAVA) is an evidence based self-report test. The AAVA is appropriate for use in clinical practice (patients) and criminal justice (offender) violence assessments. The Anger-Aggression-Violence Assessment (AAVA) focuses entirely on Anger-Aggression and Violence, which are conceptualized on an emotionally reactive continuum. Continuum theory postulates shades (or intensities) of Anger-Aggression and violence exist as points on a continuum of emotional reactivity. Continuum theory that as anger increases, it can evolve into aggression, which in turn can intensify and evolve into violence.

The Anger-Aggression-Violence Assessment (AAVA) is a 135-item self-report test that takes on average 25 minutes to complete. It has been standardized on male and female outpatients.

The AAVA has seven (7) Scales (Domains)

  • Alcohol

  • Drug

  • Stress Management

  • Truthfulness

  • Anger

  • Aggression

  • Violence

 

ANGER MANAGEMENT PROFILE (AMP)

The Anger Management Profile (AMP) is an anger, or more specifically “anger

management,” screening instrument, or test. This assessment instrument or test makes “anger” screening possible for courts, probation departments, counseling programs and mental health professionals. Sometimes, intense anger with co-occurring disorders warrants counseling (individual or group). The Anger Management Profile has 123 items and takes 25 minutes to complete. It has a sixth grade reading level. AMP reports are computer scored and printed on-site within 2½ minutes of test completion.

The AMP has five measures (scales):

  • Drugs

  • Anger Management

  • Truthfulness

  • Anger

  • Alcohol

 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INVENTORY (DVI)

The Domestic Violence Inventory (DVI) is an evidence based self-report test that is used to evaluate adult (males and females) accused or convicted of domestic violence and is a state-of-the-art domestic violence perpetrator risk assessment instrument test. The Domestic Violence Inventory (DVI) has been administered to over 85,000 domestic violence offenders. The DVI facilitates early problem identification, which promotes intervention and as warranted, treatment, while enabling accurate matching of problem severity with treatment intensity.

The DVI has 155 items, takes 30 minutes to complete and has six measures (scales): 

  • Alcohol

  • Drugs

  • Stress Coping Abilities

  • Truthfulness

  • Violence (Lethality)

  • Control

 

EMPLOYMENT BARRIERS (EB)

Family Guidance Center offers clinical services specific to the assessment and treatment of problem sexual behavior. These services are provided by William J. Bobowicz, Jr. PsyD., A.B.P.P. This type of evaluation provides recommendations for treatment to the court. Sexual offenses are committed by individuals with a wide array of psychological problems, and it is essential to identify the underlying psychological disorder that predisposes the individual to commit a sexual offense. While most, if not all, sexual offenders meet the diagnostic criteria for one or more of the sexual disorders, many offenders are also diagnosed with additional psychological disorders requiring treatment. Mental retardation, psychotic disorders, personality disorders, dementia and substance abuse can influence and individual’s sexual behavior, leading to a sexual offense. The goal of a SB Evaluation is to recommend treatment that will minimize the potential of additional sexual offenses in the future.

  • Alcohol

  • Drugs

  • Stress Management

  • Degree of Confidence

  • Work Orientation

  • Self-Esteem

 

1ST OFFENSE INVENTORY (FOI)

Non-Violent, First Offense Assessment 

The 1st Offense Inventory is designed for first offense (misdemeanor or felony) assessment (male and female). This test is particularly useful in defendant, presentence, pretrial and probation settings. The 1st Offense Inventory incorporates a Truthfulness Scale that measures the client's truthfulness while being tested. It identifies attempts to fake good, lie or minimize problems. This test was designed in response to public defender's office request. 

The 1st Offense Inventory consists of 122 true/false and multiple choice items. It takes 20 to 25 minutes to complete and has a high fifth grade reading level. If a person can read the newspaper, they can complete this test. Reports are scored and printed on-site within two minutes of data entry.

The 1st Offense Inventory has seven scales (measures): 

  • Truthfulness

  • Alcohol

  • Drugs

  • Antisocial

  • Peer Pressure

  • Entitlement

  • Self-Esteem

 

FORENSIC VIOLENCE INDEX (FVI)

The Forensic Violence Index (FVI) consists of 154 true-false and multiple choice questions and takes 25 minutes to complete. All FVI tests are computer scored. From test data (answers) input, FVI tests are scored with their 3 page printed reports available within 2 minutes. FVI assessments are appropriate for men and women. The FVI scores the anger-aggression-violence continuum and the dominant emotion is the one that is printed in the FVI report. This applies to every FVI that is scored.

Forensic Violence Index (FVI) Scales (Domains):

  • Drug

  • Antisocial

  • Impulsiveness

  • Stress Management

  • Truthfulness

  • Violence

  • Anger

  • Aggression

  • Alcohol

 

GAMBLER ADDICTION INDEX (GAI)

The Gambler Addiction Index (GAI) is a gambler (adult male and female) assessment test that assesses important gambler attitudes and behaviors. The GAI is an objective self-report test that has a Truthfulness Scale to identify denial, problem minimization and attempts to "fake good." The GAI is a statistically sound and an empirically validated test which meets and exceeds the professionally accepted standards for reliability, validity and accuracy. 

Gamblers have a higher suicide rate than most other clinical groups. And the Truthfulness Scale is particularly helpful when evaluating gamblers because gamblers are often notorious liars. The DSM-IV Gambling Scale reflects DSM-IV gambler classification, whereas the Gambler Severity Scale measures the severity of gambling problems. Stress management is another important area of inquiry when assessing gamblers. 

The Gambler Addiction Index (GAI) is designed for gambler assessment, screening, or testing. The GAI has been standardized on people in treatment for gambling, probationers on gambler caseloads, and outpatient gambler groups. The GAI is an automated (computer scored), self-report assessment instrument, or test that consists of 166 items and takes 30 to 35 minutes to complete. The GAI is written at a high 5th to low 6th grade reading level. From test data (answers) input, GAIs are computer scored with reports printed on-site, within 2 ½ minutes.

Problem gambling is clinically defined as an impulse control disorder (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th edition). The GAI contains a reformatted DSM-IV Gambling Scale. Problem gamblers have strong impulses to gamble, despite harmful life consequences. In addition, the GAI contains a Gambling Severity Scale that measures gambling intensity. These two GAI scales codetermine a meaningful gambler profile. No other gambler test incorporates these two gambling measures, or scales.

Another unique GAI feature is its Truthfulness Scale. Gamblers are notorious liars. When asked about their gambling, most problematic gamblers attempt to rationalize their gambling, deny extensive gambling involvement, or attempt to minimize it. In other words, when assessing gamblers, the evaluator needs to know if the client was honest and truthful. No other gambler test contains a Truthfulness Scale. These GAI Scales (measures) embody areas of inquiry considered, by many, as necessary for gambler understanding.

The GAI has 166 items, takes 35 minutes to complete and has seven measures (scales): 

  • Alcohol

  • Drugs

  • Stress Coping Abilities

  • Truthfulness

  • Gambler Severity

  • Suicide

  • DSM-IV Gambling Scale

 

OFFENDER ASSESSMENT INDEX (OAI)

The Offender Assessment Index (OAI) is designed for use in drug courts, family courts, municipal courts and county courts. It can be used to evaluate misdemeanor or felony charged defendants. OAI reports are particularly useful at pre-sentence hearings. The OAI is an adult male and female test that is appropriate for misdemeanor and felony defendants. The Substance Abuse/Dependency Scale utilizes DSM-IV criteria for classification. In addition, the OAI independently assesses alcohol and drug abuse severity. 

The OAI consists of 158 items and takes 35 minutes to complete. OAI's are scored on-site and reports printed in three minutes. The OAI contains seven measures (scales):

  • Substance Abuse/Dependency

  • Alcohol

  • Drugs

  • Truthfulness

  • Resistance

  • Violence

  • Stress Coping Abilities

 

OUTREACH ASSESSMENT (OA)

Outreach Assessment (OA) is an objective, evidence based, adult and juvenile screening instrument or test. It is designed for screening (assessment or evaluation) and, as warranted, referral for intervention or treatment. This important service is provided for private practitioners, psychologists, rural mental health providers, community agencies, Employee Assistance Programs (EAP's), Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO's) and others. In other words, Outreach Assessment meets the need for a brief, yet meaningful adult and juvenile screening test. Outreach Assessment identifies client (respondent) resistance and denial, anger issues, substance (alcohol and other drugs) abuse and stress management deficits.

The Outreach Assessment consists of 105 items and takes 15 to 20 minutes to complete. Tests are scored with printed reports available within 2 1/2 minutes of data (test answer) entry. The Outreach Assessment (OA) is an objective, evidence-based, adult screening instrument or test. The five Outreach Assessment scales provide a comprehensive profile of a client's risk and needs. 

The Outreach Assessment contains five measures (scales): 

  • Drugs

  • Stress Management

  • Truthfulness

  • Anger

  • Alcohol

 

PROBATION/PAROLEE IVENTORY (PI)

This test is designed specifically for parolee assessment or screening. 

The PI provides meaningful risk and needs information in an objective, standardized and timely manner. PI reports are scored and printed on-site. The PI can be administered upon probation/parolee intake, for violation review and at scheduled intervals. PI reports summarize the individual's self-reported court history, explain what attained scores mean, and offer specific score-related recommendations. 

The PI has 135 items, takes 35 minutes to complete and has eight scales (measures): 

  • Distress

  • Alcohol

  • Drugs

  • Stress Coping Abilities

  • Truthfulness

  • Violence (Lethality)

  • Antisocial

  • Self-Esteem

 

SEXUAL ADJUSTMENT INVENTORY (SAI)

The Sexual Adjustment Inventory (SAI) is an adult (male and female) sex offender assessment test. This is a state-of-the-art test that is comprehensive, informative and statistically sound. It is considered by many the best test available for evaluating sex offenders. 

The (SAI) identifies sexual deviance and paraphilias in people accused or convicted of sex offenses has been standardized (normed) on thousands of sex offenders.

The SAI is an evidence based assessment instrument or test with impressive reliability, validity and accuracy.

Unique SAI features include two Truthfulness Scales: one to determine if the client (patient or offender) lied when answering sex-related questions, and the other to decide if the client minimized problems or lied when answering non-sex-related questions. It is very important for evaluators, judges, probation officers, treatment staff and others to know if the test results are accurate. The SAI is the only sex offender test that has these two Truthfulness Scales.

Why have 13 scales? Reasons for inclusion of the 6 sex-related scales are obvious. Yet, inclusion of the 7 non-sex-related scales may not be that obvious. Each of the 7 non-sex-related scales represents problems and disorders that have been linked to sexual problems. These 7 scales, or the areas of inquiry they represent, can provide considerable sex offender insight. And many people accused or convicted of sex offenses attempt to mask, cloak or conceal these problems.

The Sexual Adjustment Inventory (SAI) is a 225 item self-report test that takes 45 minutes to an hour to complete and has thirteen scales (measures): 

  • Alcohol Scale

  • Drug Scale

  • Violence (Lethality) Scale

  • Distress Scale

  • Antisocial Scale

  • Impulsiveness Scale 


  • Sex Item Truthfulness Scale

  • Sexual Adjustment Scale

  • Child (Pedofile) Molest Scale

  • Sexual (Rape) Assault Scale

  • Exhibitionism Scale

  • Incest Classification Scale

  • Test Item Truthfulness Scale

 

Shoplifting Inventory (SI)

The Shoplifting Inventory (SI) is designed for shoplifter evaluation. Shoplifters come from a variety of backgrounds, from rural and urban settings, and are representative of different ages, genders, ethnic groups and educational backgrounds. Shoplifting statistics are shocking. There are approximately 28 million shoplifters in the United States. In the last five years more than 14 million people were caught shoplifting. Shoplifters cost retailers over $19 billion annually in terms of lost sales. And these statistics increase each year.

Most, if not all shoplifters, including first timers, scan (look around) the area until they decide it is safe to shoplift. The shoplifter “purposely conceals” upon their person merchandise that is to be shoplifted. And this is done with the intent to steal.

The Shoplifting Inventory (SI) is typically used when deciding between levels of supervision alternatives (probation or jail), diversion programs and counseling or treatment options. Consequently the Shoplifting Inventory (SI) is available to court referred evaluators, psychologists, probation officers, diversion programs, corrections staff, shoplifting treatment programs and mental health professionals.

The SI has 141 items and takes 30 minutes to complete. The SI has seven scales which include:

  • Alcohol

  • Drugs

  • Self-Esteem

  • Truthfulness

  • Shoplifting

  • Impulsiveness

  • Peer Pressure

This is a unique test that explores motivation, attitude and need. It assesses areas deemed necessary for adequately understanding shoplifters.